Victoria, Florin (Godless) 1849 Very Good

Forget 1971 Britain’s first attempt at a decimal coin was under Queen Victoria in 1849. It worked but they screwed up as well. They issued the first Florin in 1849 which was exactly 1/10th of a pound or 0.1 pounds. That denomination still exists today we call it a 10 Pence Piece. But there were some problems. They forgot to have ‘Dei Gratia’ – by the grace of God on the coin. So they quickly had to withdraw the coin and issued the Gothic Florin until two years later in 1851. The 1849 Florin is known as the ‘Godless’ Florin for that reason. It is only a one-year type coin and very important as our first decimal coin in over a thousand years. The coins on offer have seen considerable wear and are in Very Good condition. It has taken us two years to put this small group together, but we know they won't last that long in stock...
Availability: In stock
SKU: CVV5148
£79.50
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