Edward VII, Shilling Very Good

In the short reign of King Edward VII (1901-1910) the coins were still being struck in (0.925) Sterling Silver. It was a short reign so there were not all that many coins struck and some of the dates are rare but we are offering you nice type examples of Edward VII's Shilling for your collection, NO RARE DATES AVAILABLE. The coins are in Very Good condition.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CEG5351
£22.50
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Edward VII, Shilling 1902 VG Fine

In 1902 the first coinage of King Edward VII was finally issued. He became King in 1901. Now, the rules say that no coins are to be released until after the Monarch’s Coronation, which in this case, almost didn’t happen. Edward had appendicitis and in those days people died from it. But an early operation saved him and the only consequence was that his Coronation was postponed. This Shilling is a most important denomination because when you joined the Armed Forces you were said to ‘Take the King’s Shilling’. It might have been one of these that were taken, who knows... Each Shilling is dated 1902, the Coronation Year, it is struck in Sterling Silver and will grade Very Good – Fine condition. The Edward VII series is a very short one, 1902-1910, yet there are many difficult coins in this series.
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Picture of Edward VII, Silver Sixpence Very Good

Edward VII, Silver Sixpence Very Good

Edward VII Silver Sixpence. Very Good. They struck coins for King Edward VII from 1902 until 1910, a rather short reign. But then again he had to wait for Queen Victoria to pass away and she lived quite a long time. All of his silver coins are struck in Sterling Silver and the most difficult denomination to get is the Sixpence.
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1787 Shilling_obv

George III, Shilling 1787 Extremely Fine

Most will know about the illness of King George III, but most don’t know that because of that illness the King would not allow a law to make smaller coins to be passed. This of course caused a lot of problems with day to day commerce; there just were not enough small coins around to make change. There are only two silver coins struck before the Currency Reform Act of 1816, that are readily available to collectors: the George III Sixpence and the Shilling of 1787. There is a simple but almost unbelievable reason for this. These coins were struck at the Royal Mint from silver delivered from the Bank of England. The Bank decided that they would need some new shinny coins to give out to their clients at Christmas. So only the Bank of England had these silver coins, and they only handed them out during the Christmas period, and only to their wealthy clients. So now you have the whole history! You have King George III dressed in what looks like Roman armour, and on the reverse the arms of Hanover and France as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. Back in 1787, you had to be somehow important to have one of these Shillings, important enough to do business directly with the Bank of England, and someone they wanted to treat. We have selected some very high-quality examples of this beautiful and very important historical coin for your collection.
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