Victoria, Crown (Jubilee Head) Fine

We recently bought a nice group of Queen Victoria Jubilee Head Crowns issued 1887-1892. They have the Jubilee Head of the Queen on one side and St. George slaying the dragon on the other side. They are the largest silver coin struck for Queen Victoria and are struck in Sterling Silver. These coins are in Fine condition; they were carefully selected, so there are no defects, no scratches no edge knocks. Nicely well-graded coins for your collection. We have been looking around and we're amazed at just how much certain companies are charging for these coins. At Coincraft if we make a good buy, you make a good buy. Remember that all of these coins have been specially selected and they are Sterling Silver.
Availability: In stock
SKU: VJCRH
£62.50
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William IV, Halfcrown Very Good

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Edward II, Long Cross Penny London/Canterbury Fine_obv

Edward II, Penny (Long Cross) London/Canterbury Fine

Edward II also called Edward of Caernarfon, was King of England from 1307 until he was deposed in January 1327. Following the death of his father Edward “Longshanks”, Edward succeeded to the throne in 1307. The “Long Cross Penny” was the largest coin of the period and those of Edward II closely resemble those of his father. He adopted the same bust and legend. It takes a trained eye to spot differences in the lettering and the King's crown to spot a genuine Edward II. The pennies on offer here come in “Fine”. They are from London or Canterbury Mints, depending on availability. You have the crowned bust of the King on one side, under the name of Edward I. On the reverse you have CIVI TAS LONDON or CIVI TAS CANTOR, meaning “City of London (or Canterbury)”. This is the first time we have accumulated enough Edward II Pennies to offer you in almost three years, so get one while you can.
£149.50
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