Roman Imperial Coins

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Antoninus Pius Silver Denarius Very Fine_obv

Antoninus Pius Silver Denarius Very Fine

Born in A.D. 86 Antoninus was made Caesar after Hadrian’s preferred heir Aelius died in A.D. 138. He succeeded to the throne that year and earned the title ‘Pius’ (which means dutiful or respectful) for two reasons. Firstly, by threatening the Senate with resignation if they did not deify Hadrian. Secondly, as Hadrian had wanted, he adopted young Lucius Verus and Marcus Aurelius at the start of his reign. What makes him so unusual is that he presided over the most peaceful reign of any emperor, governing well and wisely as a compassionate ruler. He set up charities, built public works for his people, and brought in laws such as ‘innocent until proven guilty’; some historians have argued it could be the greatest collective human happiness in a period of time in history. In Britain, he caused the ‘Antonine Wall’ to be built from the Firth of Forth to the Firth of Clyde, north of Hadrian’s Wall, to keep the Picts out. We offer Silver Denarius of Antoninus Pius in a Very Fine condition, showing his laureate head on the obverse and various reverses.
£135.00
Constantius II_VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX_obv

Constantius II. A.D. 337-361. Arles - A.D. 357-361. AR Siliqua. VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX.

Constantius II. A.D. 337-361. Arles - A.D. 357-361. AR Siliqua. Diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / 'VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX' in four lines within wreath; 'P CON' in ex. About Extremely Fine & Scarce. With this coin the emperor is celebrating his 30th anniversary & hoping for a 40th.
£395.00
Diocletian Billon Follis AEF_obv

Diocletian Billon Follis About Extremely Fine

Diocletian was born of humble origin around A.D. 245 in Dalmatia near Split and rose through the ranks of the military to high command. He likely manoeuvred the murder of the emperor Numerian and defeated Carinus leaving Diocletian in undisputed control of the Empire. Realising it was too big for one person he appointed an old army colleague, Maximian, as co-emperor and settled the problem of succession by appointing two junior Caesars, bringing stability after 60 years of chaos. Diocletian spent much of his reign campaigning and did much to overhaul the tax system, reforming the coinage in an attempt to counter inflation. Unlike any emperor before or since he voluntarily abdicated in A.D. 305 and retired to his palace in Split. He died there in A.D. 311 a broken man, having watched his reforms trampled to death by the likes of Constantine the Great and Licinius. We recently bought a small group of high-grade Billon Silver Follis from a trusted dealer who had been slowly putting them aside for many years. Part of this group were 24 Follis of Diocletian in About Extremely Fine condition with various reverses. They are big, beautiful and they all have at least some of the ancient silvering showing on the surfaces.
£125.00
Faustina Junior Denarius Very Fine_obv

Faustina Junior Denarius Very Fine

Faustina Junior was the daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Senior. She was married to Marcus Aurelius and made Augusta in A.D. 147. They had 14 children over their 30-years marriage with 5 surviving to adulthood, including Commodus. Some ancient writers report adultery and worse but Aurelius gave her the title ‘Mother of the Camp’ for accompanying him in his wars and being beloved of the soldiers so this seems just rumours. She died in mysterious circumstances in A.D. 175 when Aurelius was very ill, possibly dying, and she helped persuade Avidius Cassius to declare himself emperor, likely to protect young Commodus. Aurelius recovered, Cassius was executed and she died around that time with Aurelius apparently devastated, having her deified and coins minted. Faustina Junior is a little scarcer than her mother, Faustina Senior, with more reverse types. We have a group of her silver Denarius in Very Fine with various reverses which we offer to you. She makes a lovely accompaniment to her husband in your collection or on her own merit!
£120.00
Faustina the Elder Silver Denarius Good Very Fine_obv

Faustina the Elder Silver Denarius Good Very Fine

Faustina the Elder was the wife of Antoninus Pius, they married and had children (such as Marcus Aurelius’ wife Faustina the Younger) a long time before he was emperor. They appear to have actually been in love with Faustina, as empress, well respected and renowned for her beauty and wisdom. She was particularly involved with charities that helped in the education of girls. Sadly she died in late A.D. 140, early in Antoninus’ reign. Devastated, Antoninus ordered children’s education charities, temples and coins made to commemorate her. We offer you a silver Denarius made for love. On the obverse they show Faustina’s bust with a distinctive hairstyle made by her braids being pulled back in a bun behind or on top of her head. She made it so popular it was still being used 3 generations later. There are various reverses, all grading Very Fine.
£120.00
Galerius Billon Follis AEF_obv

Galerius Billon Follis About Extremely Fine

In A.D. 293 the high-ranking soldier Galerius was adopted and made Caesar by Diocletian, marrying his daughter Valeria (Galeria Valeria) to cement the position. Galerius fought Rome’s enemies in the east, his main focus being the Sassanians who he finally defeated in A.D. 299 with the help of Diocletian. When Diocletian and Maximian abdicated in A.D. 305 Galerius made sure both new Caesars were his allies, meaning he as emperor was in control of ¾ of the empire. But his arrogant blundering meant that shortly, for the only time in history, six Roman emperors ruled at once as people refused to do what he wanted! He gave up in A.D. 309, focusing on fun and building. He died in A.D. 311 of a gruesome illness that Christian writers gleefully claimed came from their god for his persecutions. The coins we offer here are Billon Follis in About Extremely Fine condition showing his laureate bust on the obverse and with various reverses. They are from the same small group as the Diocletian & Maximian Follis also available on our website. Meaning they are big and beautiful and there are few of them so do not miss out…
£125.00
Gallienus. A.D. 253-268. Roman Egypt - A.D. 265. Billon Tetradrachm. Tych_obv

Gallienus. A.D. 253-268. Roman Egypt - A.D. 265. Billon Tetradrachm. Tyche.

Gallienus. A.D. 253-268. Roman Egypt - A.D. 265. Billon Tetradrachm. Laureate head right / Tyche seated left holding rudder & cornucopiae; palm behind. Extremely Fine & Rare in this grade. Roman Egyptian coins don't get much better than this.
£185.00
Geta as Caesar. A.D. 198-209. Rome AD 208. AR Denarius. Rev. PONTIF COS II_obv

Geta as Caesar. A.D. 198-209. Rome AD 208. AR Denarius. Rev. PONTIF COS II.

Geta as Caesar. A.D. 198-209. Rome AD 208. AR Denarius. Obverse: Bare-headed bust right. Reverse: PONTIF COS II. Genius standing left holding grain ears & sacrificing from a patera over lighted altar. About Extremely Fine & Scarce, slightly ragged flan.
£145.00
Gordian III. A.D. 238-244. AR Antoninianus, SAECVLI FELICITAS_obv

Gordian III. A.D. 238-244. AR Antoninianus, SAECVLI FELICITAS.

Gordian III. A.D. 238-244. AR Antoninianus. Uncertain Eastern Mint, possibly Antioch, AD 242-4. Obverse. Radiate bust right. Rev. 'SAECVLI FELICITAS' Gordian standing right in military attire holding spear & globe. Extremely Fine. (Sear 8659, RIC 216)
£75.00
Hadrian Denarius AVF_obv

Hadrian Denarius About Very Fine

Hadrian was one of the ablest and conscientious of the Roman Emperors. He spent his reign visiting the vast majority of his provinces, consolidating and strengthening the Empire’s defenses after the expansion by his predecessor, Trajan. The most famous example of his work was Hadrian’s Wall! Sprawling from the River Tyne in the East, to the River Solway in the West: at 73 miles (117.5 kilometres) it is the largest Roman monument anywhere in the world! We offer a Silver Denarius of Hadrian in an About Very Fine condition showing his bust on the obverse with various reverses. Everyone has heard of Hadrian, and he is one of the five good emperors. You can now add a silver Denarius to your collection for a very reasonable price. Act quickly supplies are limited...
£145.00
Lucius Verus Good Very Fine Silver Denarius_obv

Lucius Verus Silver Denarius Good Very Fine

Lucius Verus was born Lucius Ceionius Commodus in A.D. 130 to Aelius Commodus, Hadrian’s first Caesar who died two months before Hadrian himself. As a condition of Antoninus Pius’ adoption, he had to adopt young Lucius but preferred the older Marcus Aurelius so adopted both! Ultimately Lucius was more interested in pleasure (like his father) so Marcus Aurelius was the clear successor. But when Pius died in A.D. 161 Marcus refused to rule without Lucius, who took Marcus’ family name, Verus, in tribute. They were the first co-emperors in the Roman Empire! To force Lucius Verus to grow up he was sent East to fight the Parthians who were stirring up trouble. Though the Romans won the troops bought back ‘The Antonine Plague’ (likely smallpox) that decimated Rome. Lucius Verus likely died of this in A.D. 169 in Rome. This group of Lucius Verus coins is very scarce! A dealer sold us a small group in Very Fine that he had been putting by for a number of years. The obverse has the bust of Verus with various reverses. This will be a gap for many people so do not miss out!
£195.00
Macrinus (AD 217-218) AR Denarius PONTIF MAX TR P PP_obv

Macrinus (AD 217-218) AR Denarius PONTIF MAX TR P PP

Macrinus (AD 217-218) AR Denarius, Rome AD 217. Obverse: Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Macrinus facing to right. Reverse: PONTIF MAX TR P PP, Securitas standing facing, head left with legs crossed, holding a sceptre and resting left arm on column. [S.7347, RIC 24, RSC 62] Near Extremely Fine and Scarce
£275.00
Macrinus, AD 217-218, AR Denarius, SECVRITAS TEMPORVM_obv

Macrinus, AD 217-218, AR Denarius, SECVRITAS TEMPORVM

Macrinus, AD 217-218, AR Denarius, Rome AD 217. Obverse. Laureate and cuirassed bust of Macrinus facing to right. Reverse: SECVRITAS TEMPORVM, Securitas standing facing to left holding a sceptre and leaning on a column [Sear 7365] Extremely Fine and Scarce.
£325.00
Philip I, AD 244-249, AR Antoninianus, Rome AD 245. LIBERALITAS_obv

Philip I, AD 244-249, AR Antoninianus, Rome AD 245. LIBERALITAS

Philip I, AD 244-249, AR Antoninianus, Rome AD 245. Radiate draped and cuirassed bust of Philip I facing to right. Reverse. LIBERALITAS, Liberalitas standing to left holding an abacus and Cornucopiae. Extremely Fine (Sear 8937)
£65.00
Philip II AR. Antoninianus, Rev. AEQVITAS_obv

Philip II AR. Antoninianus, Rev. AEQVITAS

Philip II, AD 247-249, Silver Antoninianus, Antioch AD 247. Obv. Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right, Rev. AEQVITAS AVGG, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopiae [S.9259 / RIC 240a] Virtually as struck, with lovely bright tone.
£140.00
Picture of Septimius Severus Denarius Fine

Septimius Severus Denarius Fine

In A.D. 208 Septimius Severus set off for Britannia to conquer the island but he would never see Rome again! The people and the landscape of Caledonia (Scotland) proved too much and Septimius Severus, exhausted by his efforts, fell ill and died in York in early A.D. 211. His dying words to his sons were ‘stay friends, be generous to the soldiers and no one else matters’. In his reign he had increased a soldiers pay from 375 to 500 silver Denari a year, a good wage in those days! This meant he created over 1000 different denarius reverse types. We offer you these silver Denari with the head of Septimius Severus on the obverse and various reverses from the Roman Emperor who died in York. Offered here in Fine grading.
£69.50
Septimius Severus. A.D. 193-211. Rome - A.D. 201. AR Denarius. FVNDATOR PACIS_obv

Septimius Severus. A.D. 193-211. Rome - A.D. 201. AR Denarius. FVNDATOR PACIS.

Septimius Severus. A.D. 193-211. AR Denarius, Rome - A.D. 201. Obverse: Laureate head right,.Rev. 'FVNDATOR PACIS' Severus togate standing left holding branch and scroll. Good Very Fine, ragged edges (Sear 6282, RIC 265)
£110.00
Severus Alexander AR. Denarius PAX AVG_obv

Severus Alexander AR. Denarius PAX AVG

Severus Alexander, AD 222-235, Silver Denarius, Rome AD 226. Obv. Laureate and draped bust of Severus Alexander facing to right. Rev. PAX AVG, Pax advancing left holding an olive branch and sceptre. [S. 7887 / RIC 168] Virtually as struck with nice light toning.
£175.00
Severus Alexander, AD 222-235. AR Denarius, Rome AD 227_obv

Severus Alexander, AD 222-235. AR Denarius, Rome AD 227

Severus Alexander, AD 222-235. AR Denarius, Rome AD 227. Obverse. Laureate bust of Severus Alexander facing to right. Reverse. PM TR P VI COS II P P. Pax advancing to left holding an olive branch and a sceptre. Near Extremely Fine, excellent portrait on a wide flan. (Sear 7904, RIC 67)
£85.00
Severus Alexander. A.D. 138-161. Alexandria, Roman Egypt - A.D. 228. Billon Tetradrachm_obv

Severus Alexander. A.D. 138-161. Alexandria, Roman Egypt - A.D. 228. Billon Tetradrachm.

Severus Alexander. A.D. 222-235. Alexandria, Roman Egypt - A.D. 228. Billon Tetradrachm. Laureate bust right / Helmeted bust of Athena Parthenos right. Good Very Fine & Scarce. This has particularly refined detail for Egyptian coins, pleasing bust of Athena.
£225.00
Valens_A.D. 364-378_Antioch - A.D. 373-374_obv

Valens A.D. 364-378. Antioch - A.D. 373-374. AR Siliqua.

Pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / 'VOT / X / MVL / XX' in four lines; all within wreath; 'ANT' in ex. Flan crack, About Extremely Fine & Scarce. Valens was annihilated by the Goths at Hadrianopolis.
£250.00
Vespasian Silver Denarius Good Fine_obv

Vespasian Silver Denarius Good Fine

Vespasian was born in A.D. 9 to a rising family. After a slow start he led Legio II Augusta in A.D. 42 on the invasion of Britain, conquering much of the southern of England. After a varied career he retired until he was asked by Nero to put down the revolt in Judaea in A.D. 66. He worked slowly and methodically with his son Titus until the revolt was suppressed but while this was happening Nero was toppled and the chaos of the Year of the Four Emperors started. A long story short he triumphed in A.D. 69, leading the Roman world for a 10-year period of stability & rebuilding, including starting the great Colosseum. In Britain, the frontiers were expanded for Rome by Agricola, Tacitus’ father-in-law, who was the first Roman to sail around and realise we are an island! Vespasian is early in the history of the Empire and therefore difficult to find. We have been putting his coins away for a while in this grade until we have enough to offer you. They are silver Denarius in a Good Fine condition with various reverses. We don't have that many, so if a Vespasian Silver Denarius is missing in your collection, do NOT miss your chance to get a nice example!!!
£129.50