Roman Imperial Coins

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Caracalla, AD 198-217. Silver Denarius. FELICITAS AVGG_obv

Caracalla, AD 198-217. Silver Denarius. FELICITAS AVGG

Caracalla, AD 198-217. Silver Denarius. Obverse: Laureate draped and cuirassed youthful bust of Caracalla facing right. Reverse: FELICITAS AVGG, Felicitas standing facing left holding long caduceus and cornucopiae. Extremely Fine, slight edge chip at 9 o'clock.
£85.00
Caracalla_Denarius_LIBERTAS VIIII_obv

Caracalla. A.D. 198-217. Rome - A.D. 214. AR Denarius. LIBERTAS VIIII.

Caracalla. A.D. 198-217. Rome - A.D. 214. AR Denarius. Laureate head right / 'LIBERAL VIIII' Libertas standing left holding abacus & cornucopiae. Good Very Fine. The year Caracalla defeats the Germans, as shown by 'GERM' on obverse.
£90.00
Picture of Choice Antoninianus of Diocletian

Choice Antoninianus of Diocletian

Born of humble origin around A.D. 245 in Dalmatia near Split, Diocletian bought order to the Roman world after nearly 60 years of chaos. Like many of his predecessors, he had a military career, rising through the ranks to high command. Following the murder of the emperor Numerian, Diocletian was proclaimed emperor by his troops. Then the defeat of Carinus (brother of Numerian) left Diocletian in undisputed control of the Empire. Having realised the empire was too big for one person alone he quickly appointed an old army colleague, Maximian, as co-emperor. He also settled the problem of succession by the appointment of two junior Caesars, one for himself and Maximian. Diocletian spent much of his reign campaigning against Rome’s enemies on the Danube frontier, in North Africa, Egypt and Syria. Although there were Christians at all levels of society at this time, Diocletian worshipped the old Roman gods and was responsible for A savage persecution of Christians. Diocletian was a prolific builder and did much to overhaul the tax system and reform the coinage in an attempt to counter inflation. He abdicated in A.D. 305 and retired to his palace in Split. He died there in A.D. 311 a broken man, having watched his reforms trampled to death by the likes of Constantine the Great and Licinius. The coins we offer here are Billon Antoninianus in Extremely Fine condition with various reverses
£79.50
Constantius II_VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX_obv

Constantius II. A.D. 337-361. Arles - A.D. 357-361. AR Siliqua. VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX.

Constantius II. A.D. 337-361. Arles - A.D. 357-361. AR Siliqua. Diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / 'VOTIS XXX MVLTIS XXXX' in four lines within wreath; 'P CON' in ex. About Extremely Fine & Scarce. With this coin the emperor is celebrating his 30th anniversary & hoping for a 40th.
£395.00
Gallienus. A.D. 253-268. Roman Egypt - A.D. 265. Billon Tetradrachm. Tych_obv

Gallienus. A.D. 253-268. Roman Egypt - A.D. 265. Billon Tetradrachm. Tyche.

Gallienus. A.D. 253-268. Roman Egypt - A.D. 265. Billon Tetradrachm. Laureate head right / Tyche seated left holding rudder & cornucopiae; palm behind. Extremely Fine & Rare in this grade. Roman Egyptian coins don't get much better than this.
£185.00
Picture of Gordian III Billon Silver Antoninianus  AEF

Gordian III Billon Silver Antoninianus AEF

Gordian III had a rather good claim to the Imperial Throne, being closely related to no less than two previous senatorial emperors! He was the grandson of Gordian I, and the nephew of Gordian II, who declared themselves emperors in A.D. 238 from Carthage. They were in opposition to Maximinus Thrax but both were defeated by his loyal governor and died after a joint reign of just 21 days. The Roman Senate then appointed Balbinus and Pupienus as joint emperors; they immediately gave Gordian III the rank of Caesar to try to legitimise their own reign. Luckily for them, while this was happening Maximinus was killed by his own men. But, after just a few months, both Balbinus and Pupienus were themselves murdered by the Praetorian Guard. Gordian III was then proclaimed sole emperor and thus emerged from the turbulent events of A.D. 238 as sole ruler of the mighty Roman Empire, all at the age of thirteen! Very little is recorded of the events of Gordian’s six-year reign, which in ancient writings is usually a sign of peace and prosperity. In A.D. 242, he led an initially successful campaign against the Persians. But in A.D. 244, he was murdered following a plot led by the Praetorian Prefect who seized the throne and reigned as Philip I. The coins we offer here are billion silver Antoninianus showing Gordian III’s portrait on the obverse and various reverses. The grade of the coins is About Extremely Fine and as always with the Crisis of the Third Century, a minority will have weaker sections. As always, the first to order will get the best.
£59.50
Macrinus, AD 217-218, AR Denarius, SECVRITAS TEMPORVM_obv

Macrinus, AD 217-218, AR Denarius, SECVRITAS TEMPORVM

Macrinus, AD 217-218, AR Denarius, Rome AD 217. Obverse. Laureate and cuirassed bust of Macrinus facing to right. Reverse: SECVRITAS TEMPORVM, Securitas standing facing to left holding a sceptre and leaning on a column [Sear 7365] Extremely Fine and Scarce.
£325.00
Picture of Septimius Severus Denarius Fine

Septimius Severus Denarius Fine

In A.D. 208 Septimius Severus set off for Britannia to conquer the island but he would never see Rome again! The people and the landscape of Caledonia (Scotland) proved too much and Septimius Severus, exhausted by his efforts, fell ill and died in York in early A.D. 211. His dying words to his sons were ‘stay friends, be generous to the soldiers and no one else matters’. In his reign he had increased a soldiers pay from 375 to 500 silver Denari a year, a good wage in those days! This meant he created over 1000 different denarius reverse types. We offer you these silver Denari with the head of Septimius Severus on the obverse and various reverses from the Roman Emperor who died in York. Offered here in Fine grading.
£69.50
Picture of Septimius Severus Silver Denarius Very Fine

Septimius Severus Silver Denarius Very Fine

Septimius Severus was Roman Emperor from AD 193-211. In AD 208 he travelled to Britain to strengthen Hadrian’s Wall and went on to invade Scotland that same year but his plans were cut short when he became ill and died in York in AD 211. We have a few silver denarius in Very Fine Condition minted during his reign. There are different types but all have his portrait on the obverse, and usually a standing or seated figure on the reverse. PHOTOGRAPH IS REPRESENTATIVE OF COIN SUPPLIED.
£119.50
Severus Alexander. A.D. 138-161. Alexandria, Roman Egypt - A.D. 228. Billon Tetradrachm_obv

Severus Alexander. A.D. 138-161. Alexandria, Roman Egypt - A.D. 228. Billon Tetradrachm.

Severus Alexander. A.D. 222-235. Alexandria, Roman Egypt - A.D. 228. Billon Tetradrachm. Laureate bust right / Helmeted bust of Athena Parthenos right. Good Very Fine & Scarce. This has particularly refined detail for Egyptian coins, pleasing bust of Athena.
£225.00
Picture of Trajan Decius' (A.D. 249-251) 'Divi' series commemorating past emperors. Augustus. 27 B.C. - A.D. 14. Rome - A.D. 251. AR Ant. CONSECRATIO.

Trajan Decius' (A.D. 249-251) 'Divi' series commemorating past emperors. Augustus. 27 B.C. - A.D. 14. Rome - A.D. 251. AR Ant. CONSECRATIO.

Trajan Decius' (A.D. 249-251) 'Divi' series commemorating past emperors. Augustus. 27 B.C. - A.D. 14. Rome - A.D. 251. AR Ant. Radiate head of Augustus right / 'CONSECRATIO' Altar-enclosure with flames atop. Very Fine & Rare. Very interesting series of 11 that are hard to find, the choices of who were honoured are very curious by modern standards.
£365.00
Trajan_Silver_Denarius_Fine_Obv

Trajan Silver Denarius in Fine

Trajan has one of the best legacies, ancient or modern, of any Roman emperor! When later emperors were sworn in it was wished they be ‘luckier than Augustus and better than Trajan’. He literally set the bar for what the Romans saw as a good ruler. Today he is one of the ‘Five Good Emperors’. Trajan was born in A.D. 53 at Italica, in Spain, his father had been a consul and governor of Syria. Trajan rose quickly and because he was so popular, importantly with the army, he was adopted in A.D. 97 by the reigning emperor Nerva. Following the death of Nerva the next year, Trajan became emperor. His 19 year reign saw three major conflicts which led to the territory of the Roman Empire being increased to its greatest size. Within the Empire Trajan was a great builder, to name a few projects: the Forum Traiani, Trajan’s Market, an amphitheatre for sea battles and a new harbour at Ostia. He also established a number of Colonies for retired soldiers and in Italy set up a charity to help orphans and poor children called the Alimentia, shown on one of his rare coins. His most famous and lasting monument is perhaps Trajan’s Column which can still be seen in Rome. When he died he was buried beneath it with Hadrian becoming emperor. We have not been able to offer a group of Trajan’s coins for many years, especially his silver Denarius! They are becoming increasingly hard to find, as he is such a popular emperor, but with much searching and persistence we are able to offer them to you here at a Fine grade with various reverses.
£119.50
Valens_A.D. 364-378_Antioch - A.D. 373-374_obv

Valens A.D. 364-378. Antioch - A.D. 373-374. AR Siliqua.

Pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / 'VOT / X / MVL / XX' in four lines; all within wreath; 'ANT' in ex. Flan crack, About Extremely Fine & Scarce. Valens was annihilated by the Goths at Hadrianopolis.
£250.00