Licinius Bronze Coin Very Fine

Born around the year A.D. 265 in Roman Dacia, Licinius grew up with the future emperor Galerius and they served in the Roman army together. Galerius later appointed him Augustus in the West in A.D. 308. Following the deaths of Galerius, Maximinus II, and Maxentius by A.D. 313, the empire was left under the control of Licinius and Constantine the Great. Licinius married Constantine’s half-sister, Constantia, to help cement relations but in reality, both men wanted control of the whole empire! They fought on and off until A.D. 324 when Constantine defeated Licinius first at Hadrianopolis then at Chrysopolis. Licinius surrendered and, thanks to his wife, was sent in retirement. In A.D. 325 Licinius and his son were both hanged on the orders of Constantine for plotting. We offer you a bronze coin struck for Licinius which shows his bust on the obverse with various reverses in Very Fine, and as we have not been able to offer these for a long time we expect they will sell fast! Get the coin of Constantine the Great’s ultimate rival and imagine, what could the world be like if he had won?
Availability: In stock
SKU: RBB188
£39.50
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