George V, Shilling, Sterling Silver VG-F

The first coins of King George V, were struck in 925 fine Sterling Silver 1911-1919. After that date they lowered the fineness of the silver to only 500 fine silver. I have a nice little group of these Sterling Silver Shillings in Very Good - Fine condition. Not by date but again by type. Of course the more coins you order, the more different dates we will try and give you. When you joined the Army or Navy in those days you were given a Shilling, which became known as ‘The King’s Shilling’. Many of these coins were struck during World War I and thus have even more history to offer.
Availability: In stock
SKU: UGVSH
£14.95
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George V, Penny 'H' Mintmark Fine, 1918

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