George IV, Crown Fine

During the short reign of King George IV this Sterling Silver Crown or Five Shilling piece was only struck for two years 1821 and 1822. You have the portrait of King George IV on the obverse with St. George and the dragon on the reverse. There was another design crown issued in 1826 but that is very rare. This is a rather handsome and, we believe, underappreciated coin and one that over the past few years has been harder and harder to get. In fact, the few coins that we can offer you have taken us two years to put together. The coins on offer are in Fine condition. They are struck in Sterling Silver and were only struck for two years.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CGF4610
£129.50
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