George III 1760 - 1820

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Picture of George III, Crown (1818-1820) Fair

George III, Crown (1818-1820) Fair

George III 1818-1820 Crown offered in Fair condition. Dates will be of our choice. A very important coin as it was the first of the ‘new’ coinage to be struck.
£59.50
Picture of George III, Crown (1818-1820) Very Good

George III, Crown (1818-1820) Very Good

George III Sterling Silver Crown (1818-1820) offered in Very Good condition. A very important coin as it was the first of the ‘new’ coinage to be struck.
£99.50
Picture of George III, Crown (1818-20)

George III, Crown (1818-20)

In 1816 the government made all of the older coins no longer legal tender. They then issued a whole series of new coins, which were of course legal tender. This is the first type of Crown or Five Shillings to be issued for King George III. They are struck in Sterling Silver and were issued only from 1818-1820. This coin is now proving very hard to get and it has been some time since we last had enough to offer them. Dates of our choice and this coin is available in different grades. A very important coin as it was the first of the ‘new’ coinage to be struck.
From £59.50
Picture of George III, Crown (1818-20) Fine

George III, Crown (1818-20) Fine

George III Crown (1818-1820) struck in Sterling Silver and available in Fine condition. Dates will be of our choice. A very important coin as it was the first of the ‘new’ coinage to be struck.
£139.50
George III, 1760-1820. 1799 Bronzed Proof Farthing_obv

George III, Farthing 1799 Bronzed Proof

Plain edge and beautiful dark tone, a lovely coin.
£495.00
George III, Halfpenny 1806/7 Fair_obv

George III, Halfpenny 1806/7 Fair

We have just bought a group of George III Halfpennies dated 1806 and 1807, the only two dates for which this type was struck. They are well circulated and therefore fairly worn but this is because there were no more copper coins struck for circulation until 1821 and these coins continued circulating well after that. These copper coins were struck at the Soho Mint in Birmingham using the newly invented steam presses invented by Matthew Boulton and James Watt. They have the laureate bust of George III on the obverse with the date below and Britannia seated on the reverse. We can offer them in Fair to suit your budget but we also have both dates available so if you order two then we can supply both dates for your collection.
£9.95
George III, Penny 1806-7_obv

George III, Penny 1806-7

In 1806 the Soho Mint made the first copper pennies struck on a steam driven press. This design was struck for only two years 1806 and 1807. It had King George III as a Roman Emperor on one side and Britannia seated on the other side. These were the first copper coins to be struck as we know them today. Only struck for two years and available in two different grades Fine and Very Fine. They are now over 200 years old and the first of their type to be made.
George III, Shilling (Bull Head) Very Fine_obv

George III, Shilling (Bull Head)

In 1816, they changed our coinage system completely. Gone was the Guinea and in was the Sovereign. The Shilling was one of the first of the new coins to appear. This first new shilling was issued from 1816-1820 with the portrait of King George III. They were struck in Sterling Silver and are now over 200 years old. We have examples of this coin in different grades. Dates will be of our choice but the more you order the more different dates we will try and give you. Remember this is the FIRST of the new coinage…
From £18.95
Picture of George III, Shilling (Bull Head) 1816-1820 Fair

George III, Shilling (Bull Head) 1816-1820 Fair

George III Bull Head (1816-1820) Shilling offered in Fair. Dates will be of our choice, but the more coins you order the more dates we will try to give you.
£18.95
George III, Shilling (Bull Head) Very Fine_obv

George III, Shilling (Bull Head) Very Fine

George III Bull Head Shilling offered in Very Fine. Dates will be of your choice, but the more coins you order the more different dates we will try to give you.
£59.50
Picture of George III, Shilling (Bull Head) VG

George III, Shilling (Bull Head) VG

In 1816 there was the Currency Reform Act, which allowed coins to be struck even without the Monarch’s permission. This was put into place because of King George III’s illness and the shortage of small change. From 1816 on, new designs, new weights, new everything. These are the first of the new Sterling Silver Shillings issued from 1816-1820. You have the bull head of the King on one side and a crowned shield on the other side.
£39.50
1787 Shilling_obv

George III, Shilling 1787 Extremely Fine

Most will know about the illness of King George III, but most don’t know that because of that illness the King would not allow a law to make smaller coins to be passed. This of course caused a lot of problems with day to day commerce; there just were not enough small coins around to make change. There are only two silver coins struck before the Currency Reform Act of 1816, that are readily available to collectors: the George III Sixpence and the Shilling of 1787. There is a simple but almost unbelievable reason for this. These coins were struck at the Royal Mint from silver delivered from the Bank of England. The Bank decided that they would need some new shinny coins to give out to their clients at Christmas. So only the Bank of England had these silver coins, and they only handed them out during the Christmas period, and only to their wealthy clients. So now you have the whole history! You have King George III dressed in what looks like Roman armour, and on the reverse the arms of Hanover and France as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. Back in 1787, you had to be somehow important to have one of these Shillings, important enough to do business directly with the Bank of England, and someone they wanted to treat. We have selected some very high-quality examples of this beautiful and very important historical coin for your collection.
£175.00
George III, 1787 Shilling Extremely Fine_obv

George III, Shilling 1787 Extremely Fine

stop above head, no semée of hearts, nicely toned good EF.
£145.00
George III, 1816 Shilling Very Fine_obv

George III, Shilling 1816 Very Fine

toned and good VF.
£95.00
George III Bull Head Sixpence Fair_obv

George III, Sixpence (Bull Head) Fair

In 1816 they passed the currency Reform Act which changed our coinage completely. The Guinea was out and the Sovereign was in. All coins before then were no longer legal tender. One coin that was badly needed for everyday usage was the humble sixpence. So in 1816, a new Sixpence was issued. The King hated the design and the public referred to it as the ‘Bull Head’ Sixpence because of the design. But it was only struck from 1816-1820 when a new King took the throne. Dates will be of our choice, but the more coins you order the more different dates we will try and give you.
£14.95
George III 1787 Sixpence Extremely Fine_obv

George III, Sixpence 1787 Extremely Fine

These George III Sterling Silver 1787 Sixpences were only struck for circulation for just one year, 1787. What is even more interesting is that they were struck for the Bank of England to give out to their favoured clients around Christmas. You have King George III in an armoured bust on the obverse and four crowns and four shields on the reverse. Today the Royal Mint is charging £95 in Fine. The reverse in some ways is even more interesting than the obverse. As you have the arms of England, Ireland, Scotland, Hanover and France. The coins on offer are very high grade and becoming very difficult to find these days. They are available in Extremely Fine. Remember that this coin is now over 230 years old and in very high quality.
£135.00
Picture of George III, Sixpence 1787 Uncirculated

George III, Sixpence 1787 Uncirculated

Most will know about the illness of King George III, but most don’t know that because of that illness the King would not allow a law to make smaller coins to be passed. This of course caused a lot of problems with day-to-day commerce; there just were not enough small coins around to make change. There are only two silver coins struck before the Currency Reform Act of 1816, that are readily available to collectors: the George III Sixpence and the Shilling of 1787. There is a simple but almost unbelievable reason for this. These coins were struck at the Royal Mint from silver delivered from the Bank of England. The Bank decided that they would need some new shiny coins to give out to their clients at Christmas. So only the Bank of England had these silver coins, and they only handed them out during the Christmas period, and only to their wealthy clients. So now you have the whole history! You have King George III dressed in what looks like Roman armour, and on the reverse the arms of Hanover and France as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. Back in 1787, you had to be somehow important to have one of these Sixpences, important enough to do business directly with the Bank of England, and someone they wanted to treat. We have selected some very high-quality examples of this beautiful and very important historical coin for your collection.
£245.00
1787 Sixpence Very Fine_obv

George III, Sixpence 1787 Very Fine

Before the Currency Reform Act of 1816 it was almost impossible to find a sixpence or shilling to use. Yes they did make a couple of dates but they are very expensive and very difficult to find. So these 1787 Sixpence are the only coins that you can find for your collection. They are struck in Sterling Silver. George III is dressed as a Roman Emperor on this coin, which look exactly the same except for their size difference. The reverses show the coat of arms of England, Ireland, France and Scotland. This Sixpence is far more important and difficult to get than most collectors realise. It was actually struck for the Bank of England to give out to their good customers at Christmas. Add one to your collection while you can… They were also used in Australia and are known there as Proclamation coins.
£79.50
George III, Twopence (Cartwheel) 1797 Very Fine_obv

George III, Twopence (Cartwheel) 1797 Very Fine

In 1797 the Royal Mint decided to strike some new copper coins on the new steam presses. So, under King George III, they issued copper pennies and for the first time ever a copper two pence. It was so big it weighed 2 ounces of copper and became known as the Cartwheel Twopence. The public hated it because it was so big and heavy and it was only ever issued in that one the year 1797. This largest-ever bronze coin usually comes in well-used condition with lots of heavy edge nicks, as pure copper nicks easily. We have been putting away better quality coins for the past two years and here they are. The coins are in Very Fine condition with a minimum number of small edge nicks. These are truly superior coins and we are offering them at the same price that some coin dealers are charging for inferior examples.
£175.00
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