Elizabeth II, Farthing 1956 Uncirculated

The first Farthing was issued during the reign of King Edward I 1272-1307 and it was struck in Silver. The last ever Farthing was struck in 1956 under Queen Elizabeth II and was struck in bronze. In fact, there were only four farthings issued under Queen Elizabeth II. The 1956 Farthing is the most difficult of the four dates to get. It has the Queen on the obverse and the wren on the reverse. Demand of late has increased and so has the cost of buying them. Lucky that we had some in stock so we can keep our prices more reasonable. We have them in two grades Uncirculated with touches of lustre and Brilliant Uncirculated in either case they are the last Farthing ever to be issued and an important coin worthy of your collection.
Availability: In stock
SKU: UFA56S
£8.95
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The two lowest mintages of the old Penny coin were struck in 1950 and 1951 during the reign of King George VI. In 1950 they only made 240,000 coins that means for £1000 you could have bought all the 1950 Pennies they ever made. Until very recently numismatists have always thought that all the 1950 Pennies were shipped to Bermuda for use after World War II. Now we know that this information is wrong. They were also sent to the Bahamas in the West Indies. Now, these coins were actually used in circulation, because after the War there was a great shortage of small change. The island has a very salty atmosphere and thus the coins are very scarce in the higher grades. The coins on offer are in Very Fine condition and remember they only struck a total of 240,000 1950 Pennies for circulation.
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