Edward I, Treasure (Bristol) Penny 1272-1307 Very Good

The hoard of Edward I Silver Pennies was found at Montrave, Fifeshire in Scotland in 1877. It was found on the land belonging to Mr. Allan Gilmour of Lundin and Montrave. It was fully declared and sat in the British Museum for 40-50 years while they examined it. We bought a large part of the hoard from one of the heirs of the man who found them in 1877. We are offering you the chance on the Rarer Mints. They are priced right to make you happy, and if you come from one of these places, so much the better. Each coin comes with a certificate certifying that your coin comes from the Montrave Treasure Hoard and which town it was minted in. Of course the Key coin is from Berwick-on-Tweed. Here we present the coin Minted in Bristol.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CEA1004
£110.00
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