Constantius II Bronze Fine Soldier spearing fallen horseman

Continuing our series of the famous Constantinian Dynasty we offer Constantius II, the last surviving son of Constantine the Great. Constantius II was born in A.D. 317 and named after his grandfather, the Tetrach Constantius I, who came to Britain and died at York. After Constantine the Great died in A.D. 337 Constantius II shared the rule of the empire with his two brothers. After a 13 years of tension Constantius II emerged as the sole ruler of the Roman Empire. He was involved in many wars throughout his reign, putting down rebellions and defending the empire against invaders. He died in A.D. 361 on the way to fight another rival, who became his successor, Julian II. These bronze coins offered here in Fine have the reverse design of a Roman soldier spearing a fallen horseman with the obverse showing a profile bust of Constantius II. We have offered different types of Constantius II before, check your collection as we suspect you will not have this reverse from this interesting and successful ruler.
Availability: In stock
SKU: ACA2013
£18.50
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Constantius II Bronze Very Fine Soldier_obv

Constantius II Bronze Very Fine Soldier spearing fallen horseman

Continuing our series of the famous Constantinian Dynasty we offer Constantius II, the last surviving son of Constantine the Great. Constantius II was born in A.D. 317 and named after his grandfather, the Tetrach Constantius I, who came to Britain and died at York. After Constantine the Great died in A.D. 337 Constantius II shared the rule of the empire with his two brothers. After a 13 years of tension Constantius II emerged as the sole ruler of the Roman Empire. He was involved in many wars throughout his reign, putting down rebellions and defending the empire against invaders. He died in A.D. 361 on the way to fight another rival, who became his successor, Julian II. These bronze coins offered here in Very Fine have the reverse design of a Roman soldier spearing a fallen horseman with the obverse showing a profile bust of Constantius II. We have offered different types of Constantius II before, check your collection as we suspect you will not have this reverse from this interesting and successful ruler.
£28.50
George III, Imitation Spade Guinea_obv

George III, Imitation Spade Guinea

Every week we have someone bring in a Guinea or Half Guinea token and we have to tell them that they are not real. It started in the 1800’s with a man called Kettle, who made gold-looking brass copies of the King George III Spade Guinea and Half Guinea. The story is that an actress used to throw these to the audience at the end of her performance. The audience was to respond by throwing real Gold Guineas back. Is this true or not, we just don’t know. But over the years a vast number of imitations were made, none of which were meant to pass as real Gold coins. A number even had adverts on them and were obviously given out as a sort of store card. Here we offer nice examples of the Guinea from Victorian times made over 100 years ago. They have been gilded or even gold plated, but they are not real Gold. The designs may vary slightly.
£5.95
Valens A.D. 364-378. Bronze Coin (GLORIA ROMANORVM) Very Fine_obv

Valens A.D. 364-378. Bronze Coin (GLORIA ROMANORVM) Very Fine

Born about A.D. 328 Valens was the younger brother of the emperor Valentinian I. Trusted with the rule of the eastern provinces of the Empire, he spent much of his reign campaigning against the Goths and the Persians. In A.D. 376 Valens allowed the Gothic tribes to cross the Danube frontier and settle in Roman territory. But as a result of terrible treatment from the Roman Administrators (against Valen’s express orders), the Goths rebelled. Valens attacked prematurely, rushing into ‘The Battle of Adrianople’ unorganised. He was killed and his army almost wiped out! This loss meant the end of the traditional Roman Empire had begun. Valens was not gifted in war but cared for the general populace, relaxing taxes for the poor and living moderately. We offer his bronze coins showing his bust on the obverse and the emperor dragging a barbarian captive on the reverse. The reverse legend ‘GLORIA ROMANORVM’ refers to Valens as ‘The Glory of the Romans’ against the barbarians. Sadly, for him and his army, it appears the barbarians had the glory. These grade Very Fine, for the Glory of the Romans!
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