Constans Two Victories Very Fine

Continuing our series of the famous Constantinian Dynasty we offer Constans, the only son who certainly visited Britain. Born around A.D. 320, Constans was the youngest son of Constantine the Great. Following a short war with his brother, Constantine II, he survived and ruled the Western empire with Constantius II in the East. Constans even visited Britain in A.D. 343 by enduring the very dangerous crossing of the channel in mid-winter, campaigning against the Picts and Scots. This means Constans was the last legitimate Roman Emperor we know visited our shores. In A.D. 350 he was killed while on a hunting trip in Gaul by followers of the usurper Magnentius who went on to rule. We offer bronze coins struck between A.D. 342-348 with his bust on the obverse. The two Victories facing each other on the reverse symbolise military success for both Constans and his surviving brother, Constantius II. Here we offer them in Very Fine, we suspect they will sell out fast...
Availability: In stock
SKU: ARC0095
£28.50
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Picture of Constantinople Commemorative Coin

Constantinople Commemorative Coin

This is a very interesting Ancient Roman commemorative coin of Constantine the Great. It was issued to commemorate the founding of Constantinople. You have the bust of Constantine the Great on one side and a standing goddess with wings on the other. Roman commemorative coins tend to be scarce and expensive. This is one of only two commemoratives that is both reasonable and available. They are struck in copper and we have them in Fine, they represent a very important historic event.
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Constantius II Bronze Fine Soldier spearing fallen horseman_obv

Constantius II Bronze Fine Soldier spearing fallen horseman

Continuing our series of the famous Constantinian Dynasty we offer Constantius II, the last surviving son of Constantine the Great. Constantius II was born in A.D. 317 and named after his grandfather, the Tetrach Constantius I, who came to Britain and died at York. After Constantine the Great died in A.D. 337 Constantius II shared the rule of the empire with his two brothers. After a 13 years of tension Constantius II emerged as the sole ruler of the Roman Empire. He was involved in many wars throughout his reign, putting down rebellions and defending the empire against invaders. He died in A.D. 361 on the way to fight another rival, who became his successor, Julian II. These bronze coins offered here in Fine have the reverse design of a Roman soldier spearing a fallen horseman with the obverse showing a profile bust of Constantius II. We have offered different types of Constantius II before, check your collection as we suspect you will not have this reverse from this interesting and successful ruler.
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Picture of Constantinople Comm (Almost Extremely Fine)

Constantinople Comm (Almost Extremely Fine)

This is one of a handful of very interesting commemorative issues struck by Constantine the Great. The type offered here is one of the two more affordable types and was made for the founding of Constantinople in A.D. 330. They are made from bronze and show the Goddess of the city, ‘Constantinopolis’, in a helmet and war gear on the obverse. The reverse shows the goddess of Victory on the prow of a ship holding a sceptre and shield. This is to symbolise the port being captured using ships by Constantine’s son, Crispus. On a small amount of these reverses, the prow will be facing towards Victory, this is because the engravers making the designs didn’t realise the goddess was meant to be on the ship! There are enough variations in mintmarks and the styles of the designs on these to form a collection of these types alone. But the most interesting about these coins is how well they have survived! At this time bronze coins would circulate so heavily that it is very hard to find them in a good grade. We have a small collection of this commemorative from 1600 years ago in this exceptional almost Extremely Fine grade.
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