Ancient Roman, Turquoise Glass Bead Necklace

Ancient Roman Turquoise Glass Bead Necklace. Ca. 2nd and 3rd centuries A.D. 90 beads per necklace. Average 28cm. Sturdy modern strings so suitable for wearing. Each will come with a certificate of authenticity.
Availability: In stock
SKU: EAA1337
£110.00

The Romans created glass from the 1st century B.C. until the fall of the empire in the 5th century A.D. It was traded across the world and has even been found in Han Chinese tombs of the period! We offer ancient Roman Turquoise glass bead necklaces dating from the 2nd and 3rd centuries A.D. They have roughly 90 beads per necklace and they average a 30cm drop. They are re-strung on sturdy modern strings so certainly suitable for wearing immediately. Each will come with a certificate of authenticity and they will make a great addition to your collection or a gift for anyone interested in the Ancient world! Own a necklace made from beads last worn nearly 2000 years ago.

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