Admiral Gardner 20 Cash

These are fantastic Treasure coins. They were struck in Birmingham for the East India Company and sent to India by ship. Unfortunately, the ship they were on, The Admiral Gardner, sunk on the Goodwin Sands. About 25 years ago it was discovered and salvaged. The coins are copper and dated 1808. Over the last 200 years, many of them corroded especially the 20 (XX) Cash pieces, the smaller 10 (X) Cash coins tend to have weathered the sands better. The 20 Cash seems to be alright on one side and very worn on the other side. British / India Treasure coins at a most reasonable price and with a history that is both tragic and fascinating.
Availability: In stock
SKU: FID9987A
£14.95
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