Rome Commemorative AEF

This is one of a handful of very interesting commemorative issues struck by Constantine the Great. The type offered here is the other of the more affordable types and was made to reaffirm Rome as the centre of the empire in A.D. 330. They are made from bronze and show the Goddess of the city, ‘Roma’, in a helmet and war gear on the obverse. The reverse shows the She-Wolf suckling the babies Romulus and Remus. This is to symbolise the origin story of the founding of Rome. But what makes these coins so interesting is how well they have survived! At this time bronze coins would circulate so heavily that it is very hard to find them in a good grade. We have a small collection of this commemorative from 1400 years ago in this exceptional About Extremely Fine grade. You can have this well-preserved coin depicting the mythical origins of Rome and the Goddess of the city for just £69.50.
Availability: In stock
SKU: ACR0018
£69.50
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Billon Antoninianus of Maximian (286-306 A.D.) in Extremely Fine condition showing his radiate bust on the obverse and with various reverses.
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Gordian III Billon Silver Antoninianus AEF

Gordian III had a rather good claim to the Imperial Throne, being closely related to no less than two previous senatorial emperors! He was the grandson of Gordian I, and the nephew of Gordian II, who declared themselves emperors in A.D. 238 from Carthage. They were in opposition to Maximinus Thrax but both were defeated by his loyal governor and died after a joint reign of just 21 days. The Roman Senate then appointed Balbinus and Pupienus as joint emperors; they immediately gave Gordian III the rank of Caesar to try to legitimise their own reign. Luckily for them while this was happening Maximinus was killed by his own men. But, after just a few months, both Balbinus and Pupienus were themselves murdered by the Praetorian Guard. Gordian III was then proclaimed sole emperor and thus emerged from the turbulent events of A.D. 238 as sole ruler of the mighty Roman Empire, all at the age of thirteen! Very little is recorded of the events of Gordian’s six-year reign, which in ancient writings is usually a sign of peace and prosperity. In A.D. 242, he led an initially successful campaign against the Persians. But in A.D. 244, he was murdered following a plot led by the Praetorian Prefect who seized the throne and reigned as Philip I. The coins we offer here are billon silver Antoninianus showing Gordian III’s portrait on the obverse and various reverses. The grade of the coins is About Extremely Fine and as always with the Crisis of the Third Century, a minority will have weaker sections. As always, the first to order will get the best
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Constantinople Comm (Almost Extremely Fine)

This is one of a handful of very interesting commemorative issues struck by Constantine the Great. The type offered here is one of the two more affordable types and was made for the founding of Constantinople in A.D. 330. They are made from bronze and show the Goddess of the city, ‘Constantinopolis’, in a helmet and war gear on the obverse. The reverse shows the goddess of Victory on the prow of a ship holding a sceptre and shield. This is to symbolise the port being captured using ships by Constantine’s son, Crispus. On a small amount of these reverses, the prow will be facing towards Victory, this is because the engravers making the designs didn’t realise the goddess was meant to be on the ship! There are enough variations in mintmarks and the styles of the designs on these to form a collection of these types alone. But the most interesting about these coins is how well they have survived! At this time bronze coins would circulate so heavily that it is very hard to find them in a good grade. We have a small collection of this commemorative from 1600 years ago in this exceptional almost Extremely Fine grade.
£69.50