Japan, Meiji 2 Bu-kin Gold

Here we offer Japanese Gold Meiji 2 Bu-Kin (1868-1869). Before these rectangular issues, the Japanese used cash coins, round coins with a square hole in the middle. Because so many of the cash coins were damaged, the Shogunate in Japan issued these rectangular gold coins. These Gold coins are gold mixed with some silver to bring down their face value. All the coins are in Very Fine or better condition and weigh 3 grams. After this period, Japan started issuing round coins.
Availability: In stock
SKU: SGM248-9607
£115.00
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Crispus Bronze coin in Fine

Continuing our series of the famous Constantinian Dynasty we offer Crispus, the son who was second only to Constantine before being executed. A 1700-year-old mystery that will likely never be solved. Flavius Julius Crispus was born around A.D. 300, the son of Constantine the Great by his first wife Minervina. Made Caesar in A.D. 317 Crispus had a very successful military career, even helping his father to overcome and defeat the rival emperor Licinius in A.D. 324. He was all but heir to the throne but in A.D. 326 he was mysteriously executed on the orders of his father, Constantine the Great. The best theory we have is that his stepmother, the Empress Fausta, engineered it for her own son’s advancement as shortly after Fausta herself was dead on the orders of her devastated and furious husband. These bronze coins were struck in the early A.D. 320s and have various reverses. Crispus does not reign long and after his death, a ‘Damnatio Memoriae’ was enacted meaning his coins are Scarce, and we have limited stock available for this coin. These coins remain some of the best sources of information for him being Caesar. We offer them here in Fine, do not miss out.
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Picture of Gallienus Gazelle Bronze Antoninianus Very Fine

Gallienus Gazelle Bronze Antoninianus Very Fine

Gallienus ruled as sole emperor from A.D. 260-268 during one of the most difficult times in the history of the empire. Not only was the empire facing natural disasters and invasions on all sides but he had to face at least eight rebellions from his own governors and generals! He issued a fantastic group of bronze Antoninianus coins to honour the Gods, asking for their protection against these troubles. Though made in Europe, these coins were used in Britain and are a large part of the Mildenhall Hoard in the British Museum. Depicted on these coins are a variety of animals, some real and some mythical, each linked to one of the Roman deities. This series is known as the 'Gallienus Zoo Coins' and make a great set to try to complete. From this series, we offer here the Gazelle, identified as different to the antelope by the numbers ‘XI’ or ‘XII’ underneath and the straight horns. These are designed to honour Diana, the sister of Apollo and the goddess of the hunt. This is likely to bring luck to hunting and like her brother, for plagues and disease. The coins are at least Very Fine but because of the chaos at the time remember they may be a little weakly struck. As always the first to order will get the best. This is the last to complete the set we have available!
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Picture of Choice Antoninianus of Diocletian

Choice Antoninianus of Diocletian

Born of humble origin around A.D. 245 in Dalmatia near Split, Diocletian bought order to the Roman world after nearly 60 years of chaos. Like many of his predecessors, he had a military career, rising through the ranks to high command. Following the murder of the emperor Numerian, Diocletian was proclaimed emperor by his troops. Then the defeat of Carinus (brother of Numerian) left Diocletian in undisputed control of the Empire. Having realised the empire was too big for one person alone he quickly appointed an old army colleague, Maximian, as co-emperor. He also settled the problem of succession by the appointment of two junior Caesars, one for himself and Maximian. Diocletian spent much of his reign campaigning against Rome’s enemies on the Danube frontier, in North Africa, Egypt and Syria. Although there were Christians at all levels of society at this time, Diocletian worshipped the old Roman gods and was responsible for A savage persecution of Christians. Diocletian was a prolific builder and did much to overhaul the tax system and reform the coinage in an attempt to counter inflation. He abdicated in A.D. 305 and retired to his palace in Split. He died there in A.D. 311 a broken man, having watched his reforms trampled to death by the likes of Constantine the Great and Licinius. The coins we offer here are Billon Antoninianus in Extremely Fine condition with various reverses
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