George III, Crown Fair

In 1816 the government made all of the older coins no longer legal tender. They then issued a whole series of new coins, which were, of course, legal tender. This is the first type of Crown or Five Shillings to be issued for King George III. They are struck in Sterling Silver and were issued only from 1818-1820. This coin is now proving very hard to get and it has been some time since we last had enough to offer them to our collectors. Dates of our choice, but we can offer them in Fair and Very Good condition. Here we present the coin in Fair condition. A very important coin as it was the first of the ‘new’ coinage to be struck.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CGE4605
£59.50
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