George II, Halfpenny (Young Head) VG

Here we offer the scarce King George II Young Head Halfpenny. Remember that during the reign of King George II (1727-1760) the Halfpenny was the largest denomination copper coin issued. The coins are in Very Good condition, which considering they are almost 300 years is not too bad indeed. They are big chunky coins with the young head of the King on one side and an attractive seated Britannia on the other side. Supplies are limited.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CGC5030
£38.50
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