Choice Antoninianus of Maximian About Extremely Fine

Maximian was born around 250 A.D. near Sirmium, a man of humble origins who rose fast through a military career to high rank. He was later chosen by the emperor Diocletian as his colleague and co-emperor. When the Tetrarchy was proposed by Diocletian, Maximian chose Constantius (father of Constantine the Great) as his deputy, Caesar, and successor. Maximian campaigned with Diocletian against Rome’s enemies on the Rhine and Danube frontiers. But he was unsuccessful in his attempts to beat the rebel North Sea Fleet commander Carausius who had seized Britain. This was not achieved for another 10 years and then by Constantius. He later fought with success against a revolt in North Africa. When the senior emperor Diocletian abdicated in 305 A.D. Maximian also abdicated at his order, but with great reluctance. But in 307 A.D. Maxentius, the son of Maximian, rebelled against the legitimate emperor Galerius and proclaimed himself emperor in Rome, at the same time luring Maximian out of retirement to aid him. But Maximian had other plans and when he tried to usurp Maxentius’ authority he was forced to take refuge in Gaul with his son-in-law Constantine. Then in 310 A.D. while Constantine was away fighting the Franks, Maximian announced Constantine was dead and had himself proclaimed emperor at Arles. Constantine hearing of the trouble returned. Maximian fled to Marseilles where he was besieged and defeated, either being murdered or forced committed suicide. The coins we offer here are Billon Antoninianus in Extremely Fine condition showing his radiate bust on the obverse and with various reverses.
Availability: In stock
SKU: RBB170
£74.50

Billon Antoninianus of Maximian (286-306 A.D.) in About Extremely Fine condition showing his radiate bust on the obverse and with various reverses.

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