Charles II, Crown Fine

In 1662 the Mint started making silver crowns on a machine, so they were milled rather than hammered coins. The Crown or five shillings was the largest silver coin made at the time. Please remember that these coins are over 300 years old and were a hell of a lot of money at the time. You have the bust of King Charles II on the obverse four shields and his initials on the reverse. Dates will be of our choice but this first milled crown of King Charles II is available in three grades for most collectors. Offered here in Fine.
Availability: In stock
SKU: UC2CRH
£395.00
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