George IV, Shilling (Bare Head) Very Good

King George IV only ruled from 1820-1830, so his coinage was rather short-lived. The coin on offer is his sterling silver shilling issued between 1825-1829. You have the King’s head facing left and the reverse has a lion standing on a crown. They were only issued in 1825, 1826, 1827 and 1829. When you joined the army or navy you were said to take the King’s Shilling, so why not take The Sailor King’s Shilling? These coins are now over 180 years old and time to add one or more to your collection. In Very Good condition.
Availability: In stock
SKU: CGC5309
£34.50
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