George V, Threepence 1919 (the last struck in Sterling Silver) Fine

In 1919 the Royal Mint issued the last ever Sterling Silver Threepence for circulation. The next year, 1920, they reduced the silver content in our coins from 925 fine silver to 500 fine silver. King George V was on the Throne and World War I was just over, the economy needed the extra income from less silver in our coinage. We can offer the last ever Sterling Silver Threepence in Fine condition for just £8.50. It shows what inflation does to our money, today there is no silver in our coins just cupro-nickel, and even the smallest coins are only copper-plated steel.
Availability: In stock
SKU: U3D19
£7.50
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Picture of George VI,  Silver Threepence, 1938

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Picture of Gadhaiya Paisa

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